Wildlife

Animals Found at Nariva Swamp

There are many animals found in the Nariva Swamp and its Wetlands, the following is a list of some of them.


Common Name
West Indian Manatee

Scientific Name
Trichechus Manatus Manatus

Description
Inhabits freshwater, estuarine, and marine waters, where it can be found in near-shore waters, canals, rivers, estuaries and saltwater bays. A slow reproduction rate; they reach sexual maturity at three to five years old and at most they produce a single calf every two years. The young are born with molars and premolars, allowing them to consume sea grass within the first three weeks of birth. Consumes mainly sea grasses and plant leaves. Illegal poaching, as well as collisions with speeding motorboats, are a constant source of manatee fatalities.


Range
Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, throughout the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, south to coastal parts of northeastern and central-eastern South America.

Local Status
Protected

International Status
Vulnerable

Click here to read more about the Manatee


 

Common Name
Leatherback Turtle

Scientific Name
Dermochelys coriacea

Description
Found primarily in the open ocean. Prefer deep waters but most often seen within sight of land. Breeding beaches are tropical, mainland sites facing deep water. A clutch of eggs usually 50 - 170 eggs are laid in the sand. Carnivores, prey include invertebrates, mainly jellyfish and salps, also will eat small crustaceans, fish, sea urchins, and snails. This turtle is critically endangered, threats include egg collection, arvesting of adults for meat, disturbance at nesting beaches, and incidental mortality (by-catch) by fishing fleets.


Range
Found throughout the world's oceans, as far north as Alaska and as far south as the tip of South Africa.

Local Status
Protected

International Status
Critically Endangered


 

Common Name
Blue and Gold Macaw, Blue and Yellow Macaw

Scientific Name
Ara ararauna

Description
Among the most strikingly beautiful of the Macaw Family.  Usual clutch consists of two or three eggs which incubate for about 28 days. The babies will fledge after about 3 months in the nest. These birds eat a variety of seeds, nuts, and fruits which is available in the wild.  They can learn to talk with a general vocabulary of about 15 or more words or expressions.

Range
Trinidad, Eastern Panama in Central America south across northern South America including Guyana, extending to Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay.

Local Status
Protected


Common Name
Green Anaconda

Scientific Name
Eunectes murinus gigas

Local Name
Huille

Description
Mainly aquatic, but also hunt on land. Prefer swamps, marshes and sluggish or still waters. Can grow to more than 29 feet, and weigh more than 550 pounds.  
Mating period is from April to May and frequently takes place in water. They are viviparous, giving birth to 20 to 40 live young.   This snake will attack any vertebrate that they can catch and swallow, especially fish, amphibians, reptiles, other snakes, and mammals such as capybara.

Range
Trinidad, South America, east of the Andes, Amazon and Orinoco basins, and the Guianas.

Local Status
Protected


Common Name
Red Howler Monkey                         

Scientific Name
Alouatta seniculus

Description

Found in a variety of habitats ranging from tropical rain, humid, and dry forests, swamp forests, as well as semi-deciduous forests, and cacao plantations.  Live in relatively large social groups, of approximately 10 individuals, with only one or two being males. Breed throughout the year.   Herbivorous, mainly consuming fruits and fruit pulp and leaves, supplemented by roots, flowers, seeds, berries, leaf buds, bark, wood, vine parts and other plant material.  Travel most frequently occurs on tree branches and lianas but can also be terrestrial.
    
Range
Trinidad & Tobago, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela.

Local Status
Protected


Common Name
Spectacled Caiman

Scientific Name
Caiman crocodilus

Description
Usually occurs in forests, swamps, large rivers, lakes and over shallow banks. Typically sedentary, but can be quite nomadic when local conditions become inadequate. Grows to between 1.8 and 2 m with a maximum recorded length of 2.64 m. Nests are made very close to the water. Clutch size ranges from 18 to 40 eggs per nest.  Young caimans eat mostly invertebrates, switching to fish, and some terrestrial vertebrates as they get older.

Range
Northern Argentina to southern Mexico including Trinidad and Guyana.

International Status
Least Concern


Common Name
Prehensile-tailed Porcupine

Scientific Name
Coendou prehensilis

Description
Live in forests and occasionally enters cultivated areas.  No breeding season and gestation lasts 203 days, after which one precocial young is born.     
Nocturnal and arboreal. Can roll into a ball and the prehensile tail is used to curl around branches when climbing.  Diet is primarily vegetation, including leaves, tender stems, fruits, blossoms, and roots.

Range
Trinidad, Venezuela, French Guiana, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, and some extreme northern sections of Argentina.

Local Status
Protected


Common Name
Trinidad White–Fronted Capuchin

Scientific Name
Cebus albifrons trinitatis

Description
Subspecies of the widespread white-fronted capuchin this capuchin is found only on the island of Trinidad in rainforest habitats.  Females like most capuchins give birth to a single young every 1 to 2 years.  Diet consists mainly of fruit occasionally insects or other small invertebrates will be eaten.  Within the protected areas, they remain threatened by hunting, and habitat damage due to seasonal storms.

Range
Trinidad

Local Status
Protected

International Status
Critically Endangered
 

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